13 July 2014

Northern Hemisphere Summer RaDAR-Contest

The Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio (RaDAR)-America Contest is hereby announced - due to popular request - for July 26th, 2014 starting at 14:00 UTC and ending at 18:00 UTC.

All rules from prior announcement apply as posted here: RaDAR-America Contest Rules 2014

Our Canadian friends now have a chance to get out into nature without having to use snow shoes and ice picks, while we living further south will be challenged to find ways to brave the heat!

Stay safe everyone and let us know your plans on the RaDAR Google+ Community!

73 de Marcus NX5MK

08 May 2014

RaDAR-America April 2014 Contest Results

Let us celebrate the RaDAR-America Contest and it's Contestants! Please follow the link below to the Newsletter in PDF format. I hope you will enjoy the read and the photos!

RaDAR-America April 2014 Contest Results Newsletter

As some of you already know, I regret that I could not participate due to a family medical emergency, but I look forward to join you in the contestant field next time around...!

73 de Marcus NX5MK

23 March 2014

Which RaDAR-Contest Category

So you want to participate in the upcoming RaDAR-Contest, but are pondering on which category to choose...
Keep in mind: "daring to be different", during the RaDAR-Contest you may switch categories on the fly! How so? What you do prior to your 1st QSO (out of each 5) is what defines your category.

Here is an example:
You begin the RaDAR-Contest by setting up in your garden (not traveling 1km by foot or 3km by vehicle to your QTH): /P multiplier for those contacts.
After 5 QSOs, you then go 3km or more by bike/vehicle: /M multiplier for the next 5 QSOs.
After those 5 QSOs you then walk 1km or more: /PM multiplier for the next 5 QSOs...

RaDAR: Daring to be different.

73 de Marcus NX5MK

28 February 2014

March 1st On-The-Air RaDAR Meetup

Please join the March 1st RaDAR On-The-Air Meetup between 1600 and 1800 UTC. See suggested times and frequencies below. Always adjust for QRM. Home, mobile, and portable stations are welcome. Suggest using /M, /P or /PM as allowed in your country. Call CQ RaDAR. Exchange grid squares of at least six digits. This event is just for fun and is not a contest. Post setup photos on the RaDAR community and tell us how you did. Good luck on RaDAR to RaDAR contacts. 

1600 - 1630 7.185.5 LSB
1615 - 1630 7.029 CW
1630 - 1700 14.342.5 USB
1645 - 1700 14.059 CW 
1700 - 1730 21.437.5 USB
1715 - 1730 21,059 CW
1730 - 1800 28.327.5 USB
1745 - 1800 28.060  CW

Google+ Group - MeetUp Details

08 February 2014

03 February 2014

RaDAR-America Contest April 2014

The Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio (RaDAR)-America Contest is hereby announced for April 2014

Please see all rules for the "Original" RaDAR-Contest HQ here: http://zs6bne.wordpress.com/2013/11/12/radar-contest-rules-2014/

The following exceptions apply for RaDAR-America Contest participants, who want to submit their scores to RaDAR-America:

- score sheets with photos are posted on your website or your preferred blog or on the RaDAR-Google+ Community: https://plus.google.com/communities/109283065808971118728

- contesters then send the link to their posted entry to this email address:

radaramericacontest (AT) gmail.com


Here the rules for the RaDAR-America Contest in their entirety:


1. Aim

The RaDAR-America contest is a unique event aimed at promoting the use of Rapidly Deployable Amateur Radio stations. This contest is for all licensed radio amateurs throughout North, Central and South America. A choice is made prior to the contest to participate in one of the defined categories but may be changed at any time during the contest. The points system is so structured as to encourage portable operations especially moveable RaDAR stations.


2. Date and Time

First Saturday of April and first Saturday of November (5 April 2014 and 1 November 2014), starting at  14:00 UTC and ending at 18:00 UTC.


3. Bands and Modes

All amateur bands, besides the WARC bands, are allowed including cross band contacts via amateur radio satellites. Modes – CW, SSB, AM, FM or any digital mode. QSOs via terrestrial repeaters will NOT be allowed.


4. Suggested HF Calling frequencies

See http://zs6bne.wordpress.com/2013/03/06/radar-calling-frequencies/ for the latest international list of frequencies.

Recommended digital modes frequencies – Refer to the SARL Contest Manual, General Rule 15. Please remember to follow all rules for the band plan in your country!


5. Exchange

The RaDAR contest requires more than a minimalistic information exchange. Accurate information exchange is considered more important than a large QSO count.

Call sign, Name, RS(T) Report, QTH and grid locator. Note the grid locator can change as RaDAR operators are allowed to move position at any time.  The grid locator of 6 characters is acceptable but should preferably be accurate to 10 characters for higher position accuracy.


6. Scoring

1 point per QSO.

Individual QSO’s  – per mode, per band, per satellite, per call sign.


8. Categories and multipliers.

The following multipliers are applicable to determine the final score. If category changes were made during the contest then calculate accordingly.

x 1 – RaDAR Fixed station (At home or in another building)

x 2 – RaDAR Field station (Portable – away from home)

x 3 – Moving RaDAR station – Car / motorcycle / bicycle / etc.  – minimum 3 km

x 4 – Moving RaDAR station – On foot – minimum 1 km

Note: Moving RaDAR stations can move at any time but are required to move to the next destination after five contacts have been made from the present location. The move needs to cover the required distance before further contacts are allowed to be made. This requirement tests the ability to rapidly re-deploy your amateur radio field station.

Power multiplier: The power multiplier that applies is determined by the highest power output of any of the transmitters used during the contest at any point in time.

x 6 – 5 Watts or less

x 4 – 6 to 50 Watts

x 2 – 51 watts or greater


9. Bonus points (All categories)

5 Points (The equivalent of five QSO’s) for a minimum of one satellite or any digital modes QSO involving a computer, smartphone or digital modes device. (For clarity-thereafter 1 point per Satellite / Digital modes QSO)

5 Points for the first inter continental DX QSO – 10 Points if that QSO is between two participating RaDAR stations.


10. Log Sheets

The RaDAR-America Contest manager – Marcus NX5MK.

Score sheets with photos are posted on your website or your preferred blog or on the RaDAR-Google+ Community: https://plus.google.com/communities/109283065808971118728

Contesters then send the link to their posted entry to this email address:

radaramericacontest (AT) gmail.com

If you are unable to post your entry on a website, please send log and photos to above address and it will be posted on the RaDAR-America webpage for you.

The closing date for logs is 19 April 2014 and 15 November 2014.

See  https://www.dropbox.com/s/hygzv5no1gev0bx/ZS6BNE-RaDAR-GenericContestLog2013.docx for a log sheet specifically designed for the RaDAR contest.

Note: A photo of the station (JPG format) MUST accompany every log entry. A photo is required for each new location that moveable stations move to. These photos are used to promote amateur radio and the RaDAR concept showing where amateur radio can be used to communicate from and in the many different ways.

73 de Marcus NX5MK
Apparare Scientior Paratus Communicare



Disclaimer

Use of this website is at the users own risk and the author expressly disclaims all liability with respect to actions taken or not taken based on any contents of this website.
The materials on this website may be changed, improved, or updated without notice. The author of this website is not responsible for any errors or omissions in the content of this website or for damages arising from the use or performance of this website under any circumstances.
This website may contain links to other websites on servers other than the one this site is hosted on. The author is not responsible for content on external websites nor does such linking constitute an official endorsement or approval of linked external sites and their content and availability.
The use of trade, firm, or corporation names on this website is for the information and convenience of the reader. Such use does not constitute an official endorsement or approval by the author or any product or service to the exclusion of others which may be suitable.
The author will not be liable for damages of any kind (including, without limitation, lost profits, direct, indirect, compensatory, consequential, exemplary, special, incidental, or punitive damages) arising out of your use of, your inability to use, or the performance of this website or the content whether or not he has been advised of the possibility of such damages.


18 December 2013

RaDAR-America Contest November 2013 - Results

So,

here is the result for the RaDAR-America November 2013 Contest: The following logs were submitted:

Marcus NX5MK

No, I will never list my points since I believe that I cannot be considered objective, given that I am also the contest manager (...and no - I would not have won). I had fun nonetheless! Report on RaDAR deployment is posted on my blog.


Pete N0OY

He was so kind to send his log, but requested not to enter him in contest due to rules violations (he had just misread a few details in light of him having learnt about the contest just shortly before it took place), but I have to say that his log was very strong and a sure contender for the first place during the next contest! Here is his contest write up:

Friday night I put a battery pack on charge to make sure it was full. I use 12 volt NiMh battery packs and this is one reason I have not fully embraced using military gear because of the 24 volt requirement; it is easier to charge off of a my solar panel at 12 volts.
After topping off the battery and a quick power check of the Codan 2110 (25 watts) it was put into my large LC-1 Alice pack and frame. I keep it ready with the antenna mounted, cw keyer, handset, extra wire, a couple of tools, paper, and pencils stored in the various pouches. If I go out camping the pack is large enough to hold my tent, sleeping bag, food, water, stove, and any thing else I feel I can't live without and want to pack. It always sits by the door waiting for me to go play radio.

For my main antenna I use a 16 foot Jackite pole with a single wire that can wrap around for extra length and it re-winds into a fishing reel for easy storage when collapsed. I can set the pole to any height from 4 to 16 feet depending on bands used and the terrain I'm in. An odd length of wire wound on a chalk line reel is used for a varying length counterpoise when fixed and when in motion I use a Teflon drag wire . The fiberglass pole is mounted via compression clamps to the alice frame. The Codan has 2 antenna inputs, one for 50 ohms and no tuner and a single wire or whip antenna stud with an internal tuner that can handle just about anything I hook to it. I rarely use screw on whip antennas but instead prefer to use the 16 foot vertical.

I started out with a hike to a open field on my farm where I set up at my first location.  Off with the backpack, raise the antenna, and throw out the counterpoise wire. I have all the hf pak frequencies programmed in the radio and can scroll through them quickly with a front panel button and in this case I chose to start on 14.3425 and with a quick hit on the ptt and the tuner has the vertical matched in a couple of seconds. Total set up time is usually under 2 minutes.  First contact was with KK4DKT/p at 1415z pm usb, in fact I never did use the keyer today.

By 1440z I had worked 5 stations and then it was off to another pasture just over the required 1 km distance. Again off with the pack and raise the antenna to start the process over again and be on the air at 1515z, same frequency.  I bumped into a couple of friends on 20 meters and got to explain what I was doing roaming around in a pasture but they were good for 2 of 5 QSOs. Then I'm headed to another location that required climbing over fences and through tall grass to get to a road. 

(Even with the antenna collapsed to 4 feet I can still listen while walking to get a feel for band conditions and hear some stations that are on. If the area is easy to navigate and no obstructions, I'll leave the antenna up and if by chance make a contact while walking). 

From this road to another pasture with really tall grass for my 3rd operating location. Same drill, off with the pack......and this is where lack of simple preparation showed up. In my haste I had not read and understood the rules thoroughly before the contest, I read 'all amateur frequencies' and stopped there, that is what created an oops moment, duly noted in the log...... 20 meters was crowded and I wasn't having any luck finding a spot to call CQ so I tuned around on 17 meters, it was crowded too, so I checked 15 meters by calling a few CQs on the Hfpak frequency, no contacts and no signals heard. BUT 12 meters was open so I found a clear frequency, called CQ, and made 5 QSOs including Spain in about 30 minutes. Sitting and planning my next move I get a cell phone call from a neighbor who was having mechanical trouble and could possibly use my help. So I'm thinking about how this is the end of the outing and I'm going to help him if need be. In order to take a note I move the log sheet on my clip board and then I see the WARC bands not to be used note... I didn't read that earlier.........no excuse, my bad, all the QSOs do not count.... Later I learned about the camera rule too.........this has been a learning experience in reading the rules completely.

I decided to stay put and wait and see if my neighbor calls back for help.   So  back  to 14.3425 and try to make some contacts while wiping egg off my face and just enjoy the the last hour of the contest, the wx was great to be outside.  In retrospect I'm glad I did, I bumped into a milpak friend who was mobile and I got caught up with his travels and then Marcus showed up on frequency which allowed us to make a /pm to /pm qso, I always wanted to do that! 

In summation, I really enjoyed the outing / contest. I met people who enjoy the back packing / portable operation concept as much as I do. Caught up with some old friends on the bands. Enjoyed just rag chewing and not having to move on the next contact to make numbers. My equipment, after years of refining is playing well. I came up with more antenna ideas to try. Can't wait to do it again.....  So use my log as a check log and not as an entry and accept a BIG thanks for putting this outing / contest on.

73, Pete   NØOY /pm

BTW my neighbor did not need my help after all........


Next up is: Steve KF5RYI 

...with 48 points and he gave us a great write up on the RaDAR Google+ community, thank you Steve!


And now we come to the final entry and winner of the contest!



 (drum roll please...)


...and the winner is:

Greg N4KGL: 245 points!


Fantastic Greg! Your write up of the contest was also one of a kind and your continued rallying of RaDAR-America has made it grow in this first year beyond anything I had hoped for. RaDAR has become a vibrant community and I look forward to 2014.

It's high time now that I come up with an appropriate Certificate Design! Any help with it would be truly welcomed...!


Once more, congratulations Greg! But I and the others will give you more of a challenge next time around ;)

31 October 2013

News

For breaking news and reports on the RaDAR Program and RaDAR-America Contest, please visit the RaDAR Google+ group, thank you.

73 de Marcus NX5MK

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/109283065808971118728?cfem=1

FAQ: photo for every QSO or just a photo for every new QTH?

Question: "A photo or video of the station MUST accompany every log entry." Does this mean a photo for every QSO or just a photo for every new QTH?

Answer:
When RaDAR only requires a 1km walk / jog before deployment, a photo is required of the deployment area. These could be used to promote RaDAR and share in the excitement of each deployment.

When RaDAR movements to new destinations are required, it is requested to have one photo for each deployment / new QTH to document actual change in location.

73 Marcus NX5MK for the RaDAR-America Contest

08 October 2013

RaDAR November 2013 Contest Announcement and Rules


 

1. Aim

The RaDAR-America contest is an event aimed at promoting the use of Rapidly Deployable Amateur Radio stations throughout North and South America. This contest is for all licensed radio amateurs. A choice is made prior to the contest to participate in one of the defined categories. The points system is so structured as to encourage portable operation, especially moveable stations.
The rule structure is very close to that formulated by the founder of the contest idea: Eddie ZS6BNE
This contest will take place at the same time in South Africa (the Nation from which the idea originated), as it will here in the Americas. Please note that the most significant difference between the South African RaDAR rules and the RaDAR-America rules are in the suggested frequencies, which have been adapted and changed to comply with the IARU Region 2 band plans. If you choose to operate on the suggested South African RaDAR frequencies, please note that some are in the EXTRA band section for US operators and others are entirely outside of the IARU 2 band plan.


2. Date and Time

First Saturday of April and first Saturday of November starting at 14:00 UTC and ending at 18:00 UTC (4 hours).


3. Bands and Modes

All amateur bands, besides the WARC bands, are allowed including cross band contacts via amateur radio satellites.

All Amateur Radio operating rules within the country of operation are to be respected and followed at all times.

QSOs via terrestrial repeaters will NOT be allowed. You must make all of your contacts on Simplex only.

Modes – CW, SSB, AM, FM or any digital mode.


4. Suggested HF and VHF voice calling frequencies

The frequencies posted by HFPack http://hfpack.com/air/
are suggested as HF activity frequencies if not already in use. Please note that HFPack operates USB on all bands to achieve complete compatibility with a wide variety of commercial and Military portable HF radio systems that amateurs are using.

Suggested VHF frequency: 144.300. Frequencies that have a potential conflict with repeater inputs (low end of 146 Simplex) are to be avoided.

Contesters are requested to operate by The Amateur's Code
http://www.qcwa.org/amateur-code.htm
and with the request to keep in mind that HFpack has established methods for courteous operation on the suggested frequencies
http://hfpack.com/air/#methods
[Please note that HFPack does not sanction contests and that this contest is not organised by a Founder or Moderator of the group.]

Contesters are also requested to respect all International Distress frequencies:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_distress_frequency
http://www.iaru-r2.org/documents/explorer/files/Plan%20de%20bandas%20%7C%20Band-plan/R2%20LF-MF-HF%20Bandplan%202010.pdf
as well as 146.520 MHz - the National Simplex Calling Frequency. Fixed stations are however encouraged to monitor these frequencies, so that they may be able to assist HAMs in distress. 

Contacts made within +/- 5kHz of the IARU Region 2 HF Distress Frequencies will not be counted for a valid QSO.


Please additionally respect the NCDXF/IARU beacons operating on 14.100, 18.110, 21.150, 24.930 and 28.200 MHz.


5. Recommended digital modes frequencies

CW: HFPack frequencies.
Other: all legal digital frequencies at established activity centers for the respective mode.


6. Exchange

Call sign, Name, Report (RST), QTH and USNG grid locator (at least 6 digits). Note the grid locator can change as RaDAR operators are allowed to move to the next destination at any time.

Maidenhead grid LOC information may be submitted instead of USNG locator. The grid locator of 6 digits is acceptable but should preferably be accurate to 10 digits.

If the grid locator is not known, then some other information that could describe the location, e.g. Mabula Lodge, 40 km west of Warmbaths. Note that several SmartPhone HAM log apps support this feature (e.g. HamLog for the iPhone).


7. Scoring

1 point per QSO.
1 QSO per mode, per band / satellite, per call sign. You may work another call sign several times, but only once per mode and only once per band throughout the entire contest period (you may work several call signs per band and per mode).


8. Categories and multipliers

The following multipliers are applicable to determine the final score.

Category multiplier:

x 1 – RaDAR Fixed station (At home or in another building). These stations may NOT call QSO, allowed to monitor and reply to QSOs only.

x 2 – RaDAR Field station (Portable away from home). These stations are to log themselves as /p ("portable"). At least one photo or video of the station MUST accompany the log.

x 3 – Moving RaDAR station, Car / Motorcycle / Bicycle / Maritime – Minimum 3 miles (approx. 5 km) per 5 QSOs. These stations are to log themselves as /m ("mobile"). A photo or video of the station MUST accompany every log entry.

x 4 – Moving RaDAR station, on foot – Minimum 0.6 miles (approx. 1 km) per 5 QSOs. These stations are to log themselves as /pm ("pedestrian mobile"). A photo or video of the station MUST accompany every log entry.

Note: 

1) Moving RaDAR stations can move at any time but are required to move to the next destination after five contacts have been made. The move needs to cover the required distance before further contacts are allowed to be made.
2) Moving stations may also operate while in motion, but need to have covered the required distance for every 5 QSOs. Note: safety and all (traffic) laws take precedence at all times.


Power multiplier:

The power multiplier that applies is determined by the highest power output of any of the transmitters used during the contest.

5 watts or less the power multiplier is 6.
6 to 50 Watts, the power multiplier is 4.
51 watts or greater, the power multiplier is 2.


9. Bonus points (All categories)

5 Points (Equivalent to five QSOs) for a minimum of one satellite or any digital mode QSO involving a computer. (For clarity: Thereafter 1 point per Satellite / Digital modes QSO)


10. Notes: 

1) A photo or video of a "Field" or "Moving" station MUST accompany every log entry.
2) Images or videos may be posted on the contesters preferred website, preferred website service or else; links must however be listed within the log file. Photos may alternatively be copy/ pasted in to the log.
3) All logs and submitted photos will be published at http://RaDAR-America.blogspot.com under the following copyright:
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US
with all Copyrights to the contents otherwise remaining with the submitting Amateur Radio Operator.
4) Published logs and photos are to serve as a learning resource.


11. Log Sheets

QSOs are to be entered in the log sheets found at the following link:
http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/20878991/RaDARContestLog2013.doc
and be submitted within 14 days of the contest.

Completed log sheets are to be filled out directly within WORD and emailed to:
radaramericacontest (AT) gmail.com
as a WORD or PDF file.

Printed Log sheets may also be scanned or photographed and emailed.

The winner will receive a feature Blog entry and certificate.


Please do share all your operating tips and comments on the log sheets.

73 de Marcus NX5MK
RaDAR-America Contest Manager

09 September 2013

...the difference between RaDAR and SOTA.

The summit is the operations destination of the SOTA operator. The journey to the summit (including, and back) is the operations focus of the RaDAR operator. For every five QSO's, the RaDAR operator is required to move (on the move QSO's are allowed as long as the five QSO rule is valid).

https://plus.google.com/communities/109283065808971118728

Monthly RaDAR Challenge Honor Role - August 2013


And the winner of the Monthly RaDAR Challenge is...

Greg N4KGL

who is hereby recognized as the outstanding Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio Operator for August 2013 with 25 points on one day.

Runner up is Eddie ZS6BNE with 19 points.



All time Honor Roll:

August 2013: Greg N4KGL
June 2013: Greg N4KGL
May 2013: Greg N4KGL

See all the action at:
https://plus.google.com/communities/109283065808971118728

29 July 2013

Monthly RaDAR Challenge Honor Roll - June 2013

And the winner of the June 2013 Monthly RaDAR Challenge is...

Greg N4KGL

who is hereby recognized as the outstanding Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio Operator for June 2013.



All time Honor Roll:

June 2013: Greg N4KGL
May 2013: Greg N4KGL

Monthly RaDAR Challenge Honor Roll - May 2013

And the winner of the May 2013 Monthly RaDAR Challenge is...

Greg N4KGL

who is hereby recognized as the outstanding Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio Operator for May 2013.










April 2013 RaDAR Contest Winner

The winner of the 1st ever RaDAR-America contest, which took place April 6th, 2013, is hereby announced:

It is Greg N4KGL.

Congratulations to him for demonstrating outstanding Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio Operations!

Images from N4KGL's activation.

Revision of the Monthly RaDAR Challenge rules (with immediate effect)


The goal of the monthly RaDAR challenge is to encourage development of equipment and operating skills for Rapid Deployment Amateur Radio. This is good preparation for RaDAR contests or emergency scenarios. RaDAR contests typically have time constraints that increase the challenge. Impromptu or scenic outdoor locations are encouraged.

The Challenge score is the sum of contact points during a day local time. Contacts must be made at locations that don't have permanent facilities for amateur radio. Power must be independent of commercial mains. One or more locations can be used in a day. Locations must be 1 km apart for foot travel and 5 km apart for vehicle travel. If you traveled at least 1km to a location on foot a QSO is worth two contact points. Otherwise a QSO is worth 1 contact point. Note, contacts made while in transit count at the next location.
Report locations with grid square, number of QSOs, and contact points at that location. A photo for each location is encouraged.

A daily bonus is 10 points for using a sat for at least one contact, 7 points for a using digital mode for at least one contact, 5 points for a net check in, 3 points for using CW for at least one contact and 5 points for using QRP for at least one QSO (5 watts or less CW and digital and 10 watts for SSB). The bonuses are summed for the day.

A daily score can be turned in at any time. The top ten daily scores will be recognized each month. The best score per person will be used.
Separate recognition is given to the RaDAR operator with the most days of having operated a RaDAR station each month, irrespective of the number of contacts made.

QSOs can be HF/VHF/UHF via simplex except for sat QSOs.

73 from the RaDAR Team.

19 July 2013

RaDAR – disaster relief communication?

See article in EngineerIT regarding RaDAR.

In this monthly feature, Hans van de Groenendaal ZS6AKV, executive chairman of the South African Amateur Radio Development Trust (SAARDT), looks at various technologies and activities that drive amateur radio. SAARDT is dedicated to the development of amateur radio in South Africa with a special interest in the youth. The organisation is funded by donations and supports the South African Radio League and SA AMSAT.
...

14 May 2013

Thoughts on the definition of /PM for RaDAR

I have been a member of HFPack for several years as my major interest lies in pedestrian mobile operations with a backpack/ manpack radio.

During one of my hunts for information on the internet on pedestrian mobile operations, I came across the RaDAR concept as outlined by Eddie ZS6BNE.

What is surprisingly hard to find is a definition on what /PM operations really are. For some it seems to be limited to operating ones (HF) transceiver while actually walking, for others it seems to include any operation where the radio gear is transported repeatedly by foot to a different QTH within short time periods, or in other words: one may take the backpack/ manpack off for a rest, erect an antenna with whatever means, an operate.
One could argue that the latter in essence constitutes /P portable operation, but does /P operation (as during Field Day) not imply that I transport my gear by vehicle to a location, setting up a semi-temporary antenna and operate usually high power, possibly with the aid of a generator?
And what is with all /M mobile operators? Are they "only" portable operators when they are not in motion with their vehicles?

Given these thoughts, it might be worth a closer look at the definition of how someone defines for themselves what /PM is.

In the context of the RaDAR contest and the RaDAR program, a /PM portable mobile operator is any Amateur Radio operator who transports his radio gear by foot with frequent changes of his QTH.

This, depending on the climate and current weather conditions, can be a physical as well as mental challenge and also draws upon all of the operators technical knowledge and experience.

The SOTA program certainly brings this to an extreme and respect is certainly due for all those who operate from the highest mountains. For those who either live in a non-mountainous region, or who do not feel the desire to climb mountains and instead prefer to operate in the valleys, there is the RaDAR-Program.
For those who operate from valleys, there is certainly the added challenge of getting their signals across the mountains!

So, are you up to the RaDAR-Challenge?!







03 May 2013

Revised RaDAR-America Program Rules


The RaDAR Program Bonus Point Rules are hereby revised and simplified with immediate effect.


1. Aim

The RaDAR Program is aimed at promoting the use of Rapidly Deployable Amateur Radio stations and is for all licensed radio amateurs. The points system is so structured as to encourage portable operation, especially pedestrian mobile stations, be it for fun or in preparation for EmComm. 
CW operation, Net participation and ragchewing is rewarded.
The use of Maidenhead and especially USNG/MGRS locators is encouraged through it's point structure as to facilitate Search and Rescue operations (SAR).
Please also see the following links for more information on USNG:
For more insights, tips, and configuration information for some of the mobile apps currently available, follow this link.
Please also consider Mission Manager - FREE Software for SAR for your next ARES and non-ARES Public Service deployments.
The RaDAR rule structure is close to that formulated by the founder of the RaDAR contest idea: Eddie ZS6BNE 

2. Date and Time 

Every calendar month from the first day of the month at 00:00 UTC until the last day of the month at 23:59 UTC.

3. Bands and Modes

All amateur bands 6m and lower, as well as any satellite bands, are eligible for entry.

Modes – Any.

4. Conduct

All operators are to follow the Radio Amateur's Code:
as well as all legal requirements.

5. Exchange

Call sign, type of operation ( /portable /mobile /maritime mobile /pedestrian mobile" etc., as applicable, as defined below under "#8 Categories"), Name, Report (RST), QTH using USNG/ MGRS or Maidenhead grid locator (at least 6 digits).
Note that the grid locator can change as RaDAR operators are allowed to move to the next destination at any time.
Note that several SmartPhone apps support these advanced grid locator features (e.g. HamLog or Theodolite for the iPhone).


6. Scoring

Total score per month is the sum of all daily scores.

Daily score calculated as follows:

Per call sign: 1 QSO point per contact per every 5 minutes of contact (i.e., if your QSO is over 5 and up to 10 minutes = 2 QSO points, over 10 minutes and up to 15 minutes = 3 QSO points, etc.. Rag chews are encouraged!).

Per participation in a EmComm Net or round table discussion Net: 1 QSO point for every 5 minutes (i.e., if you participate in your Net over 5 and up to 10 minutes = 2 QSO points, over 10 minutes and up to 15 minutes = 3 QSO points, etc.. Net participation is encouraged!).

Note:

1) Moving RaDAR stations can move at any time but are required to move to the next destination after five QSO points have been made. The move needs to cover the required distance before further QSO points may be documented.

2) Moving stations may also operate while in motion, but need to have covered the required distance for every 5 QSO points.

Note: safety and all (traffic) laws take precedence at all times. All operators operate at their own risk at all times.


7. Bonus points  (Are added to QSO points before applying category and power multipliers)


1 Bonus point for every digital (including CW) QSO.
1 Bonus point per QSO documented with Maidenhead locator for your own position. 
1 Bonus point per QSO documented with Maidenhead locator for your contact's position. 
2 Bonus Points per QSO documented with USNG locator for your own position.
2 Bonus Points per QSO documented with USNG locator for your contact's position.
RaDAR operators may look up the locators themselves, no need for the contact to relay it. 
1 Bonus point per QSO if QTH is documented on an online APRS map. Screen photo of RaDAR operator's location on an online APRS map may substitute for a photo or video for mobile or portable RaDAR stations, as proof of QTH change.


8. Categories multipliers

Per day:

x 1 - Stations situated within a building may ONLY log points if their QSO was with a field or moving RaDAR station

x 1 – "Portable" RaDAR Field station (any place exterior to a building in which people live, locations as balconies and patios count as portable operation sites). These stations log themselves as /p ("portable"). At least one photo or video of the station MUST accompany the day's log entry (APRS beacon may not substitute photo in this category!).

x 2 – "Mobile" Moving RaDAR station, Car / Motorcycle / Bicycle / Maritime – Minimum 3 miles (approx. 5 km) per 5 QSO points. These stations log themselves as /m ("mobile"). A photo or video of the station MUST accompany every QTH (to document relocation by required distance, see below for substitution with APRS beacon). 

x 4 – Moving RaDAR station, on foot – Minimum 0.6 miles (approx. 1 km) per 5 QSO points. These stations are to log themselves as /pm ("pedestrian mobile"). A photo or video of the station MUST document every QTH change (see Bonus points for substitution with APRS beacon).


9. Power multiplier:

The power multiplier that applies is determined by the highest power output of any of the transmitters used per day.

5 watts or less, the power multiplier is 6.

6 to 50 Watts, the power multiplier is 4.

51 watts or greater, the power multiplier is 2.

100 watts or greater, the power multiplier is 1.



10. Entry details:

A) Log entries, images, videos, total daily and monthly QSO points should be posted on the operator's preferred website, preferred website service or else; link to this with Calculated Monthly Points is then to be sent to radaramericacontest AT gmail.com by the 3rd of each following month.

B) The monthly winner will be entered in the program's roll of honor.


11. Sample calculation of RaDAR Program Points:

QSO + QSO time/duration points + Digital Bonus + Maidenhead Bonus (your QTH) + Maidenhead Bonus (contact's QTH) + USNG Bonus (your QTH) + USNG Bonus (contact's QTH) + APRS Bonus = total contact points per QSO made.



Add up all QSO contact points made per day.

Total contact points per day x Category Multiplier x Power Multiplier = Total RaDAR Points per Day.

Add up all "RaDAR Points per Day" obtained during a month and submit.

26 April 2013

...now also on Google+

Look for the Google+ community Rapidly Deployable Amateur Radio (RaDAR). The community is for sharing RaDAR ideas and photos but access is not required to participate in the challenge.